Say Bye to the Common Cold with New Scientific Breakthrough

We’ve all had the common cold. Adults get an average of two to three colds every year according to the CDC. Over 200 different viruses cause the common cold and there is no cure. Until this point, scientists have tried and failed at developing a cure for the most common infectious disease.

UK scientists have developed a molecule that prevents cold viruses from replicating inside human cells. Prior to this development, researchers have been stumped about how to stop the common cold because of the viral variation of cold viruses. This molecule blocks a key protein in a body’s cells that cold viruses hijack to replicate.  If the molecule passes tests and is proven to be safe, this drug can stop the common cold in its tracks.

Researcher Prof Ed Tate said, “The idea is that we could give it to someone when they first become infected and it would stop the virus being able to replicate and spread.”

Additional research reveals that this different type of cure also has potential to work as a highly effective treatment drug for the cold.

Tate said that targeting host cells rather than the virus was “a bit radical” but necessary because of the variety of cold viruses and how quickly they evolve.

Safety trials for the miracle molecule could begin in as soon as two years.

 

Alex Warmus, Staff Writer

Sophomore Alex Warmus is a staff writer for the 2017-2018 Colonel. He is probably asleep right now.

Author: thecolonel306

The Colonel is Ledyard High School's award-winning news magazine, serving as the student voice of LHS for almost 50 years.

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