A Few of the Best and Simultaneously Obscure Novels

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1 ) Lost Voices by Sarah Porter

Lost Voices is a beautifully rich novel of abuse, neglect, loss, love, and pain. The writing exhibits an artful use of imagery, and delicately crafts each individual character. Book one in a trilogy, Lost Voices is followed by Waking Storms and finally concluded by The Twice Lost.

Lost Voices surrounds meek, 14 year-old Luce in her daily routine of rejection and embarrassment, up until the moment that her one and only guardian sexually assaults her on the cold edge of the Alaskan cliffs. Following her assault, Luce expects to die, falling willingly off the edge of the cliffs — but instead undergoes a stunning transformation into a tailed creature, congregating with a group of young girls who have also seemingly plummeted to their deaths — going missing to the world, and alternately beginning lives in another world. Upon first glance, Luce believes this world is her safe haven, and easily befriends and is accepted by the other girls in the group. However, she later discovers that this world is not as seductive as it portrays to be, and instead is much more sinister.

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2) The Stranger Beside Me by Ann Rule

The Stranger Beside Me is one-of-a-kind true crime shocker. The novel, written by Ann Rule, details her personal experience in a work environment, and in a friendship, with serial killer Ted Bundy. Ann had already procured a book deal to write about the anonymous notorious criminal prior to her discovery that the person the police were looking for was one of her closest friends.

Rule takes careful detail in the sequence of Bundy’s life, his history of crime, and all the while portrays the horrifying process of coming to terms with such an unearthing.

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3) The Postmortal by Drew Magary

The Postmortal is an awe-striking sci-fi/ thriller piece surrounding the idea of a world occupied by humans who have been provided with “the cure” for aging–– a “cure” that proves to be particularly sinister. Overpopulation continues, natural resources dwindle, children lose motivation in schooling, and adults, in turn, lose motivation for work as they realize they will never experience retirement. Crime is committed on an exponential level, and parents face the task of caring for multiple generations of offspring. The Postmortal is a bleak and terrifying look at a world where “zest for life” has been virtually depleted, even though death, life’s one final blow, is no longer a threat.

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4) Confessions of a Sociopath by M.E. Thomas

Written by a self-proclaimed (and allegedly clinically diagnosed) sociopath and narcissist, Confessions of a Sociopath details carefully, through the blurred lens of a deluded being, the mind of a person infatuated with oneself and obsessed with fantasies of power, manipulation, and omnipotence.

The author carefully attempts to craft the image of an attractive, headstrong woman who refuses to be bothered with things as trivial and silly as human emotions, but instead crafts one of a pathetic underachiever with a warped sense of importance. Confessions of a Sociopath should be interesting for anyone who takes an interest in psychology.

Note: The author, who wished to remain anonymous, was discovered after she agreed to an appearance on the Dr. Phil show, using only a wig to disguise herself. Shortly after her appearance on the Dr. Phil show, she was fired from the law school at which she had been employed.

Jolie Suarez, Staff Writer

Sophomore Jolie Suarez is a staff writer for the 2016-2017 Colonel. She spends her time outside of class playing soccer and swimming. She also enjoys reading, writing, and singing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in A&E

Author: thecolonel306

The Colonel is Ledyard High School's award-winning news magazine, serving as the student voice of LHS for almost 50 years.

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