The Way Super Bowl Commercials Should Work

There’s a reason non-football fans watch the Super Bowl. The commercials. We’ve all come to expect great things of Super Bowl commercials, like the adorable Clydesdale and his puppy friend or the stripper M&M. But this year, all the commercials were sadly lacking. We were swamped with dull car commercials and famous people talking to the camera. The quality of the images were great and the music was inspiring, but the commercials themselves had no impact. Can you remember what any of them were about?

When marketers are paying $5 million for a 30-second commercial and when 17.7 percent of adults believe commercials are the most important part of the Super Bowl, according to USA Today, why are the commercials so bad? Why do marketers bother paying so much just to play electronic music and give us really good pictures of a car that nobody’s going to remember the name of? It’s ineffective and quite frankly, annoying.

So what’s the solution? In addition to paying an exorbitant amount of money, marketers who want a commercial aired during the Super Bowl should have to submit an “entry.” All the entries will then be judged by the channel in a kind of competition and only the best commercials should “win” a spot in the Super Bowl. This way, only the best commercials — the funniest, the most influential, the cutest — will air, and we can count on the Super Bowl for even better entertainment and advertising.

If we really want to avoid bad advertising and disappointment we should implement a new system to maintain the tradition of quality during America’s most watched sporting event.

Alex Houdeshell, Assistant Editor-in-Chief of Horizons

Junior Alex Houdeshell is the Assistant Editor-in-Chief of the 2015-2016 Horizons Yearbook. She is the president of Operation Smile and participates in Cupcakes for Causes. She is on the soccer team and she runs Indoor Track and Track and Field.

Author: thecolonel306

The Colonel is Ledyard High School's award-winning news magazine, serving as the student voice of LHS for almost 50 years.

Tell us how you feel

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s